My Nemesis Revealed

My Nemesis Revealed (illustration by Heather @Mile73.com!)The guy sports a van dyke, which should tell you everything you need to know. If you’re not familiar, the van dyke is part soul patch, part handlebar mustache – think three musketeers, or the painted beard on the V-for-Vendetta mask. He’s a good looking twenty-something, well-dressed, and it’s easy to picture him in his natural habitat, drinking canned beer at this month’s trendy dive bar, quietly besting every earnestly mutton-chopped man with his black-belt-level hipster facial adornment.

We’ve both ridden the #35 for years, though not always together. My schedule is static, his seems flexible, so it’s only a few shared rides a month, but I always notice him when he gets on, wanting to take his picture and send it to LookAtThatFuckingHipster.com. He’s always aloof, not talking to his fellow riders, and considering I’ve seen most of my fellow 35-ers at King Burrito and other neighborhood cheap-eats spots, but never him, I imagined him traveling to Farm or Rontoms for dinner so that he could eat with his own kind. Fine by me.

Last week, I had a two-seater to myself when he got on and sat down beside me. I said good morning, and he gave a silent nod, meeting but not exceeding the minimum courtesy guidelines for public transit. He started getting out a book, which I imagined would be David Foster Wallace or perhaps Catcher in the Rye, but it turned out to be a children’s chapter book. I was trying to fit that book into my preconceptions of his life-as-Portlandia-skit existence when I heard his voice for the first time.

He was audibly struggling to read the large-type text, sounding it out slowly, clearly focused on the words more than the sentences. As he read, his finger inched along the page to accompany the labored soundtrack of syllables, and I began hurriedly deconstructing the damning picture of him that I had assembled using years’ worth of insignificant and inaccurate so-called clues.

He wasn’t aloof, but shy, and avoiding conversation meant avoiding the struggle to communicate. He probably didn’t eat at King Burrito because the massive billboard of a menu over the cash register – all words, no pictures – was a flagrant taunt of his capabilities. He wasn’t a hipper-than-thou trend-follower, but a guy who probably felt “different” every single day and chose a look that made him feel special for reasons he had some control over. In every regard, I had been wrong.

I stared out the window, listening to his quiet syllables, suffocating in my own shame. When my stop arrived, I wished my seat-mate a good day, and hoped it was the first time he had ever noticed me. I hate to think he had spent the last few years dismissing me as a judgmental bastard who stupidly assesses people based on superficial information. And if he had, I hoped he would never know how right he had been.

Story contributed by Bill Reagan (@williamreagan). Read more of Bill’s writings at www.WilliamReagan.com.

Illustration by Heather!

About Bill Reagan

Bill Reagan enjoys how public transit juxtaposes neighbors and strangers in a way no other microcosm of our community can. He likes eavesdropping, striking up random conversations, and watching how people act when they think no one is looking. He can be found online at WilliamReagan.com and @WilliamReagan on Twitter.
This entry was posted in 35, Bus and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

7 Responses to My Nemesis Revealed

  1. Rene says:

    Well, I can honestly say that I’ve made Tri-met judgements myself, and felt like a complete shit afterwards. So you are not alone AND you’re a better person today for having sat next to him, and maybe even made his day brighter by saying hello to him. 😀

  2. Rene says:

    I wrote a short piece on one of my experiences, too, putting my shame to words. Didn’t post it to the internet, tho. Maybe I should.

  3. Heather says:

    I envy Mr. Reagan’s wordsmithiness. Always fantastic stories from that fellow.

  4. Jeannie says:

    Bill always knocks ’em outta the park. The perfect blend of humor and heart. More please!

  5. Crandall says:

    how does one shut down the judgemental brain? My favorite is… “suffocating in my own shame”. This needs to be a short film with narrative thoughts!

  6. Pingback: My Nemesis Revealed

Comments are closed.